Indigenize!

Rekindle Your Wild Joy and sense of deep Belonging through spiritual ecopsychology and the arts, incl. bioregional awareness, animistic perspectives, strategies for simple living, & low/no-tech DIY fun.

“Making Thought Whole Again” Evolver event June 11, 2015

“Making Thought Whole Again.”

That’s the topic on which I’ll be in invited dialogue with host Glenn Aparicio Parry, linguist Matthew Bronson, and philosopher Ashok Kumar Gangadean as part of Native Wisdom for Modern Times on Evolver Learning Lab on July 16, 2015.

On a personal note, I must admit that the messenger from Evolver won me over not only with the interesting topic, but with her invitational email: “We would like some influential and radical women who can talk on various topics he will be covering.”  Influential and radical. Who can resist being flattered like that? 🙂

Seriously, it felt so refreshing to see “radical” reflected back as a positive professional achievement. After all, along with meaning “extreme, especially as regards change from accepted or traditional forms,” the word radical also means something quite fundamental: “forming a basis or foundation”; “of, or going to, the root or origin“; and existing inherently in a thing or person.”* So it makes sense to view radical thinking as a root teaching, instead of some weird offshoot to raise one’s eyebrows at. (I’m actually not digressing. My point is that Evolver’s courageous attitude bodes well for their endeavors, including this series.)

From the Evolver website:

Native Wisdom for Modern Times

Native Wisdom for Modern Times

5 Sessions • Starts June 25, 2015.

Host: Glenn Aparicio Parry, with Special Guests: Gregg Braden, Grandmother Mona Polacca, James O’Dea, Grandmother Susan Ka’iulani Stanton, Vernon Masayesva, Ashok Gangadean, Tina Fields, Carole Hart, Matthew Bronson, David Christopher, and Jerry Honawa.

“For all of the achievements of modern “progress,” the Western way of thinking has led us — personally and collectively — to a crisis. We experience ourselves as fragmented beings, separated from one another and Nature, and this alienation has led to destructive behavior that endangers the future of life on this planet.

“But each of us has the potential to transcend this crisis, and leave the era of separation behind.

“…At the legendary SEED Gatherings, [Parry] convened pioneering dialogues that brought together Native American elders and leading-edge Western scientists, to uncover the common perspectives of scientists and mystics. They also shared traditional Indigenous and Eastern spiritual techniques to help integrate this understanding into a reimagined, contemporary way of life.

“For this unique course, Glenn has gathered some of the most insightful and celebrated participants from the SEED dialogues and more to lead you to a deep appreciation of the emergent paradigm. They will teach time honored practices that will support you on the journey to a new way of thinking and being. And they will share their own experiences of the same journey.

 “These sessions will be filled with provocative information, honest testimonials, and practical advice from some of the thinkers, writers, and doers at the leading edge of this new, emerging paradigm of reality.”

*

To check it out or learn more, click:  Native Wisdom for Modern Times

*
  * Definitions of “radical” are from http://dictionary.reference.com

 

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2 Responses to ““Making Thought Whole Again” Evolver event”

  1. JGavin Bergstrom Says:

    Tina,
    This course sounds like it was amazing and ultimately enlightening for some. I’ve only recently found this site, having stumbled upon it, I found myself intrigued by your message. The reality of Relativity and the absolute experience, rather than consequence, of learning in natural environments using modern technology. Anyway, rather then sharing my thoughts. Let me say thank you for the May day music. It made me cry, although I’ve never been to Ireland. Strange ambiguous kind of reaction even if I am Irish. Although, recently I’ve read anyway there is some kind of distinction between weeping and crying? It would seem any emotion at all has become more complex these days.

    Thank you

    • Tina Fields Says:

      Hello JGavin, I’m glad to know my work is touching you.
      I think there is a definite difference between weeping and crying. In my experience, crying is focused on something immediate and painful, whereas weeping comes from a deeper heart and often signifies joy upon perceiving Beauty (big B for soul beauty, rightness/harmony, numinous grace; not just a pretty appearance small-b beauty product beauty). Ancestral memory awakened through music can sure evoke that. How wonderful. Thank you for commenting.


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